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The World War II Blogathon - Day 3


Welcome to Day 3 of The World War II Blogathon.

We're marking the 80th anniversary of the start of World War II with this three day blogathon on films and TV series related to the war.

If you have any problems leaving comments here, then you can contact me on Twitter @CineEssentials or email me at cinemaessentials @gmail.com.

You can read the entries for Day 2 here.

I start things off today with a look at David Lean's epic The Bridge on the River Kwai.

And here's another classic from the archives, as an all-star cast parachutes into Holland in A Bridge Too Far.

Make Mine Film Noir uncovers a tale of post-war revenge in Cornered.

Diary of a Movie Maniac discovers The Secret of Santa Vittoria.

Sean Munger explores the last days of the Third Reich in Downfall.

18 Cinema Lane discusses In Love and War.

The Midnite Drive-In reviews the book Five Came Back, about the wartime experiences of John Huston, Frank Capra, William Wyler, John Ford and George Stevens.

DB Movies Blog looks at Clint Eastwood's Letters from Iwo Jima.

Pale Writer uncovers the secret work of the Office of Strategic Services in the spy thriller O.S.S.

Taking Up Room follows a group of American nurses in the Philippines in So Proudly We Hail.

Retro Movie Buff is on a pilgrimage with Powell and Pressburger in A Canterbury Tale.

The Pure Entertainment Preservation Society goes under the waves with Cary Grant and John Garfield in Destination Tokyo.

Movie Rob sails into action with The Sea Wolves, checks out the original Inglorious Bastards and reviews the documentary Anne Frank Remembered.

Back to Golden Days joins the famous Doolittle Raid in Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo.


Comments

  1. My final entry in the blogathon

    https://midnitedrive-in.blogspot.com/2019/09/book-review-five-came-back.html

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi! Here's my second and final contribution. I hope you enjoy it https://palewriter2.home.blog/2019/09/03/dont-come-back-o-s-s-1946/

      Delete
  2. Hi, Jay--wasn't sure if you saw this on Twitter, but here's my third post: https://takinguproom.wordpress.com/2019/09/03/so-proudly-we-hail/

    ReplyDelete
  3. https://mikestakeonthemovies.com/2019/09/02/counterpoint-1968/ I left this over at Maddy's sight. Sorry.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's okay, I put you down for Day 2 already.

      Delete
  4. Hello, here's my post on 'A Canterbury Tale': http://www.retromoviebuff.com/pilgrims-progress-a-canterbury-tale-1944/ Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Hi! Here's my entry on "Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo".
    http://back-to-golden-days.blogspot.com/2019/09/the-world-war-ii-blogathon-thirty.html

    Thanks for hosting and sorry for being a day late.

    -Cátia. xo

    ReplyDelete

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