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About
At Cinema Essentials we explore film history, discovering great films, classic films, forgotten films and overlooked gems, with a little bit of classic TV thrown in. The articles on this site avoid gratuitous spoilers, but for the best known older films, it's safest to assume that some might slip through. 


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Writing for Cinema Essentials
We now accept guest posts! If you are interested in writing for Cinema Essentials, please email cinemaessentials @gmail.com


Around the Web
Cinema Essentials is now a multi-media experience. You can find us on Twitter, Facebook, Wordpress and Pinterest.


Contact
If you are offering a highly paid film, television or book reviewing gig, or if you are looking for someone to write a history of the James Bond films, or if you want to contact me for any other reason, then you can email me at cinemaessentials @gmail.com


Copyright and Attribution
This blog uses images from film and TV productions and publicity materials for the purposes of commentary and criticism on a fair use basis. If you are the copyright owner of an image on this site and feel that this usage violates your copyright, then please contact me and I will remove it.

Unless otherwise stated, all articles on this website are written by J. Watts. All written material is copyright J. Watts and Cinema Essentials, unless otherwise stated, and may not be reproduced without permission. Brief excerpts and quotes may be used, provided full credit is given to Cinema Essentials together with a link back to the original post or article.

Comments

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    1. Hey, Nuwan. Thanks for stopping by. I will give your blog a look. Cheers.

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