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About
At Cinema Essentials I explore film history, discovering great films, classic films, forgotten films and overlooked gems, with a little bit of classic TV thrown in. The articles on this site usually avoid major spoilers and I will give advanced warning if I think they are unavoidable. 


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Copyright
This blog uses images from film and TV productions and publicity materials for the purposes of commentary and criticism on a fair use basis. All written material on this website is copyright J. Watts and Cinema Essentials, unless otherwise stated, and may not be reproduced without my permission.


Contact
If you are offering a highly paid film, television or book reviewing gig, or if you are looking for someone to write a history of the James Bond films, or if you want to contact me for any other reason, then you can email me at cinemaessentials @gmail.com


Jay


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The Trap (1966)

The Trap is set in the wilds of British Columbia in the late 19th century. A French-Canadian fur trapper, Jean La Bete (Oliver Reed), arrives at a trading post with his latest wares, just as a wife auction is finishing. Yes that's right, a wife auction. (They do still have those in Canada, right?) A group of women have arrived, petty criminals and prostitutes, who have been freed from jail by horny lonely frontiersmen, on condition that they marry their benefactors.

One woman's prospective husband has died and so she is auctioned off to the highest bidder. Jean tries to bid but is too late. Later, after a night of drinking, he arrives at the home of the owner of the trading post (Rex Sevenoaks), demanding the money he owes him. The trader is in financial trouble, heavily in debt, and Jean's appearance makes things worse. He had been told that Jean was dead, but now he has to find money to pay this debt too.

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In 1965 Michael Caine starred in The Ipcress File, his first starring role, and the first of three films featuring British spy Harry Palmer. Palmer is a relatively lowly field operative who spends much of his time engaged in routine surveillance work for the department of Colonel Ross (Guy Doleman). When a Government scientist is kidnapped, and his minder killed, Palmer is transferred to the department of Major Dalby (Nigel Green), to replace the dead man and to help track down the missing scientist.

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