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About
At Cinema Essentials I explore film history, discovering great films, classic films, forgotten films and overlooked gems, with a little bit of classic TV thrown in. The articles on this site usually avoid major spoilers and I will give advanced warning if I think they are unavoidable. 


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Copyright and Attribution
This blog uses images from film and TV productions and publicity materials for the purposes of commentary and criticism on a fair use basis. If you are the copyright owner of an image on this site and feel that this usage violates your copyright, then please contact me and I will remove it.

Unless otherwise stated, all articles on this website are written by me, J. Watts. All written material is copyright J. Watts and Cinema Essentials, unless otherwise stated, and may not be reproduced without my permission. Brief excerpts and quotes may be used, provided full credit is given to Cinema Essentials together with a link back to the original post or article.


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Cinema Essentials is now a multi-media experience. You can find us on Twitter, Facebook, Wordpress and Pinterest.


Contact
If you are offering a highly paid film, television or book reviewing gig, or if you are looking for someone to write a history of the James Bond films, or if you want to contact me for any other reason, then you can email me at cinemaessentials @gmail.com


Jay


Comments

  1. Hi Jay, Glad to come across your website.
    Do check out my Blog too (link:- https://nononsensewithnuwansen.wordpress.com)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hey, Nuwan. Thanks for stopping by. I will give your blog a look. Cheers.

      Delete

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The 39 Steps (1959)

Alfred Hitchcock's 1935 classic The 39 Steps is one of his best films of the 1930s. It's also been a highly influential one, influencing not only Hitchcock's later films, but also those of just about anyone else who has made a thriller in this vein since.

British film, theatre and television have found it almost impossible to leave the story alone, so enamoured are they with the Hitchcock film. There have been an additional two film versions, one in 1959 and one in 1978, a TV film in 2008, and a popular tongue-in-cheek stage version in the 2000s. Although The Thirty-Nine Steps was originally a popular novel by John Buchan, most of the subsequent versions have patterned themselves more on Hitchcock's film than on the original book.
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In The Matrix, Keanu Reeves plays Thomas Anderson, an average guy living an average, unfulfilling life in an average and anonymous American city, somewhere at the end of the 20th Century.

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Following the success of the all-star murder mystery Murder on the Orient Express (1974), that film's producers, John Brabourne and Richard Goodwin, followed up with another lavish Agatha Christie adaptation, 1978's Death on the Nile.

As with Murder on the Orient Express, Death on the Nile assembles a group of mostly wealthy travellers taking part in an exotic journey, in this case a steam boat trip along the River Nile in Egypt in the 1930s. Among the passengers on board are a honeymooning couple, wealthy American heiress Linnet Ridgeway (Lois Chiles) and her new English husband Simon Doyle (Simon MacCorkindale), as well as the latter's jealous ex-fiancée Jacqueline (Mia Farrow), who appears to be stalking them wherever they go.



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