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Announcing the World War II Blogathon


In September 2019 it will be 80 years since the outbreak of the Second World War. To mark this anniversary, I will be joining my friend Maddy, of Maddy Loves Her Classic Films, to host a blogathon of portrayals of World War II in film and television.






We will be accepting articles and reviews on feature films, documentaries, TV movies and TV series, as well as articles on the WWII experiences of actors or film makers. As there are so many possible choices for this blogathon, we will be asking that there be no duplicate entries. So please sign up early if you want to claim a particular topic.

The blogathon will run from 1st - 3rd September 2019. You can sign up by leaving a comment here or on Maddy's blog. Please grab one of our banners to publicise the blogathon. I hope you will join us in marking this anniversary.


Participation List

Cinema Essentials - The Guns of Navarone (1961) and The Eagle Has Landed (1976)

Maddy Loves Her Classic Films - Danger UXB (TV series) and Battle of Britain (1969)

Palewriter - Mrs Miniver (1942) and O.S.S. (1946)

Thoughts All Sorts - Kelly's Heroes (1970)

Vinnieh - Carve Her Name with Pride (1958)

Back Story Classic - The Demi Paradise (aka: Adventure for Two) (1943)

The Stop Button - The Big Red One (1980)

Realweegiemidget Reviews - A Bridge Too Far (1977)

Poppity Talks Classic Film - La Grande Vadrouille (aka: Don't Look Now ... We're Being Shot At!) (1966)

Cinematic Scribblings - Army of Shadows (1969)

Movie Movie Blog Blog II - Schindler's List (1993)

Down These Mean Streets - Hangmen Also Die (1943)

Back to Golden Days - Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo (1944) and The Great Escape (1963)

Dbmoviesblog - Letters from Iwo Jima (2006)

Make Mine Film Noir - Cornered (1945)

Caftan Woman - Corvette K-225 (1943)

Silver Screenings - Tora! Tora! Tora! (1970)

Critica Retro - The Seventh Cross (1944)

The Midnite Drive-In - Von Ryan's Express (1965), Patton (1970) and Five Came Back: A Story of Hollywood and the Second World War

In the Good Old Days of Classic Hollywood - From Here to Eternity (1953)

Mike's Take on the Movies - Sahara (1943)

Dubsism - Fighter Squadron (1948)

Overture Books and Films - Hollywood Canteen (1944)

Taking up Room - The Mortal Storm (1940), Buck Privates (1941) and Wake Island (1942)

Pop Culture Reverie - The Dirty Dozen (1967)



























Comments

  1. Can you add me with A Bridge too Far (1977)? Thanks Gill at Realweegiemidget Reviews.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, great choice. Thanks for taking part.

      Delete
  2. Hi, I'm in and would like to take Hangmen Also Die. I see you'll talk about two of my favorites.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Great to have you taking part. I look forward to reading that.

      Delete
  3. Would it be possible to write an entry for the World War II Blogathon that discusses a film like Cornered (1945), about the immediate aftermath of the war as experienced by Dick Powell's character Laurence Gerard? And if I need to pick a date, can it be September 3?

    Many thanks for hosting!
    Marianne
    Make Mine Film Noir

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, that OK. I'll put you down for it.

      You can post on whichever day is best for you. Thanks for joining.

      Delete
  4. I signed up for this on Maddy's page, and I've updated my blog-a-thon page to include this! https://dubsism.com/2019-movie-blog-a-thons/

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks J-Dub. Welcome aboard.

      Delete

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