Skip to main content

Little Voice (1998)

Jane Horrocks as L.V.
Laura is a painfully shy young girl. So shy that she can barely answer the telephone, and so quiet that her mother has nicknamed her “L.V.” for “Little Voice”. She lives in a seaside town in the north of England with her brassy, domineering mother (Brenda Blethyn) and memories of her more sensitive, music loving father.



L.V. (Jane Horrocks) spends most of her life in her room, listening to her late father's record collection, and performing perfect imitations of Marilyn Monroe, Shirley Bassey, Judy Garland and other famous female singers of the past. Her life changes dramatically when two men take an interest in her. The first is young telephone engineer and pigeon fancier Billy (Ewan McGregor), who has hopes of romance with L.V. The second is small time agent Ray Say (Michael Caine) who, halfway through a drunken fumble with her mother, hears L.V. singing upstairs. He is entranced, and thinks she can be his ticket to the big time. He arranges for her to sing at the local club run by Mr Boo (Jim Broadbent), but L.V.'s shyness and lack of preparation leads to disaster. Ray perseveres though, and is sure he can get L.V. to find her voice and perform in front of an adoring audience and under the gaze of big time London promoter Bunnie Morris (Alex Norton).

Michael Caine and Jane Horrocks
Little Voice is written and directed by Mark Herman and based on the play The Rise and Fall of Little Voice by Jim Cartwright. The original 1992 stage production was directed by Sam Mendes at the National Theatre. The film and play were designed to showcase the talents of Jane Horrocks, and her singing and impersonations of famous female singers are remarkable. The film's centrepiece is L.V.'s second, triumphant performance, where Horrocks gets to run through her extraordinary repertoire.

Ewan McGregor and Philip Jackson
But what made for a memorable night at the theatre inevitably doesn't quite translate onto film. Little Voice only really works in fits and starts and the treatment often lacks subtlety, with the director much more comfortable and assured with the comedy than he is with the drama. Like Mark Herman's previous film, Brassed Off (1996), there is quite a bit to enjoy and plenty of earthy northern humour. In Little Voice it's often at the expense of the low quality, end-of-the-pier acts at Mr Boo's night club. The irony here is that some of the acts we're meant to laugh at, like the overweight boy band "Take Fat", would probably end up on prime time TV now on Britain's Got Talent.

Brenda Blethyn as Mari Hoff
As a comedy, Little Voice mostly works; as a tragedy and a character study ... mostly not. The film attempts to open the play out with location filming in the Yorkshire seaside town of Scarborough, but Herman's style is altogether too realist for the material. The story is a fanciful one that needs a touch of the fairy tale. The film doesn't delve into L.V.'s peculiar background and when it takes a turn into tragedy it rings false. And the seedy agent Ray Say's faith in L.V. and willingness to spend every penny he owns promoting her, when she suffers from stage fright and crippling shyness is just not very plausible. The symbolism is also unsubtle, with the film drawing a clunky parallel between L.V. and one of Billy's racing pigeons that's desperate to fly the coop and not return home.

The performances are also a mixed bunch and the characters are painted in very broad strokes. Brenda Blethyn portrays L.V.'s mother as a crude stereotype of a working class, middle aged woman; crude, crass, boozy and sex-starved. Fortunately Horrocks is much better, although she only really gets a chance to shine in her big musical show scene. Ewan McGregor is okay in a low-key, under written role as L.V.'s sort of boyfriend, and Jim Broadbent is reliable as the small time club owner who gives L.V. her big break. Best of all though is Michael Caine, who is terrific as the gloriously tacky agent Ray Say. But the contrast in acting styles is jarring and the overbearing performance of Blethyn threatens to overwhelm some of the subtler actors.

Jim Broadbent, Michael Caine and Brenda Blethyn
Remarkably, of the three leading performances, it was Brenda Blethyn's that was nominated for an Academy Award, as Best Supporting Actress. Michael Caine did win a Golden Globe Award, with Horrocks and Blethyn both nominated, and all three received BAFTA nods. In fact, the film probably did more for Caine than for Horrocks and marked the beginning of a career renaissance for him after a rough decade appearing in straight-to-video efforts, a Steven Seagal movie, and (shudder) making a film for Michael Winner. Within a couple of years he had a second Academy Award as best supporting actor, for his performance in The Cider House Rules (1999).

As a stage to screen transfer, Little Voice is only fitfully successful. Its attempts at symbolism are a little heavy-handed, its characters are often crudely drawn and the story sort of falls apart in its final act. But it's occasionally funny script makes it moderately entertaining and it's worth seeing for the performances of Michael Caine and Jane Horrocks in particular. And Caine fans can celebrate the fact that his career renaissance began here.

Little Voice

Year: 1998
Genre: Comedy, Drama
Country: UK
Director: Mark Herman

Cast Jane Horrocks (L.V.), Brenda Blethyn (Mari Hoff), Ewan McGregor (Billy), Michael Caine (Ray Say), Philip Jackson (George), Jim Broadbent (Mr Boo), Annette Badland (Sadie), Karen Gregory (Stripper), Fred Feast (Arthur), Graham Turner (L.V.'s Dad), Howard Grace (Talent Scout), Alex Norton (Bunnie Morris), Melodie Scales (George's girlfriend)

Screenplay Mark Herman, based on the play The Rise and Fall of Little Voice by Jim Cartwright  Producer Elizabeth Karlsen  Cinematography Andy Collins  Production design Don Taylor  Editor Michael Ellis  Music John Altman  Costume design Lindy Hemming

Running time 97 mins  Colour Deluxe
Production company Scala Films  Distributor Miramax



Comments

Popular posts from this blog

The Liquidator (1965)

“The name's Oakes. Boysie Oakes.”

It doesn't really work, does it? But in the mid 1960s everyone was trying to cash in on the James Bond craze. Rival spy series included Matt Helm, Harry Palmer, Bulldog Drummond and Derek Flint. MGM's hopes for a Bond rival were pinned on Rod Taylor as Boysie Oakes in The Liquidator.

Taylor's character is an ex-army sergeant who is inducted into the British secret service by spy master Colonel Mostyn (Trevor Howard). Mostyn has been tasked by his boss (Wilfrid Hyde-White) to recruit an agent to carry out unofficial assassinations off the books. Mostyn recalls an incident in wartime Paris, shown in a black and white flashback sequence, when he was rescued by Oakes from two would-be assassins. Unbeknown to him, Oakes's heroics were mostly accidental. Oakes goes along with the plan, smitten as he is with the money he's paid, the E-Type Jaguar he's given, the swanky '60s bachelor pad apartment and the endless parade of bea…

Early Hitchcock Classic: The 39 Steps (1935)

For me, The 39 Steps is the quintessential Hitchcock film. Other films may have weightier themes or a more complex subtext, but The 39 Steps boils the Hitchcock thriller down to its essential elements – a shocking murder, an innocent man on the run, a beautiful blonde and a MacGuffin so irrelevant that few people can remember what it was all about.

The film is based on John Buchan's 1915 novel The Thirty-Nine Steps, but the translation to film is so loose I think “inspired by” would probably be the more accurate description. In fact, the film strays so far from the novel that the writers had to create a new explanation for the title, having forgotten to include the actual steps that feature in the book.


The hero of Buchan's novel is Richard Hannay. On a visit to London from South Africa, he finds himself mixed up in a spy plot when one of his neighbours, a freelance American agent called Scudder, is murdered by enemy spies. He had stumbled onto a sinister plot and has crucial…

The Spy Who Loved Me (1977)

In the mid-1970s the James Bond series was in trouble. Harry Saltzman, one half of the original Bond producing partnership, was embroiled in financial difficulties with his outside business interests, and left the series following 1974's The Man with the Golden Gun. That film had been the least successful in the history of the Bond series, rushed into release the year after the more successful Live and Let Die. The first two Roger Moore films had latched onto popular trends in contemporary cinema, Blaxploitation in the case of Live and Let Die, and the kung fu craze in The Man with the Golden Gun, but the Bond series was looking increasingly like a 1960s hangover on its last legs.

The next Bond film then, the 10th in the "official" Eon Productions series, was something of a make or break effort for Bond. Albert R. Broccoli was now the sole remaining producer of the series, and he gambled that audiences were ready again for a dose of grand escapism. The next film would b…